Craft Your Life With Altenew

A Personal Conversation with Altenew Operations Director Nicole Picadura

September 28, 2020 Jennifer Rzasa and Nicole Picadura Season 1 Episode 3
Craft Your Life With Altenew
A Personal Conversation with Altenew Operations Director Nicole Picadura
Chapters
Craft Your Life With Altenew
A Personal Conversation with Altenew Operations Director Nicole Picadura
Sep 28, 2020 Season 1 Episode 3
Jennifer Rzasa and Nicole Picadura

What is it like as a crafter to work at your dream job? Join us for this personal conversation with Altenew Operations Director, Nicole Picadura, and learn all about her crafting journey. Does she still get time to craft?

Enjoy taking a ride through the story of Altenew Academy and learning about the special relationships Nicole has developed with Altenew fans over the years. Find out lots of interesting fun facts about Nicole, including the funny story about her husband's name!

Craft your life with Altenew! Follow us for more design inspiration:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/altenewllc/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/altenew
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/altenew
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/altenew/
Card blog: https://www.blog.altenew.com
Scrapbook blog: https://www.mixedmedia.altenew.com

Visit www.altenew.com to shop for your crafting stash.

Contact our Customer Happiness Team at support@altenew.com if you have any questions.

Show Notes Transcript

What is it like as a crafter to work at your dream job? Join us for this personal conversation with Altenew Operations Director, Nicole Picadura, and learn all about her crafting journey. Does she still get time to craft?

Enjoy taking a ride through the story of Altenew Academy and learning about the special relationships Nicole has developed with Altenew fans over the years. Find out lots of interesting fun facts about Nicole, including the funny story about her husband's name!

Craft your life with Altenew! Follow us for more design inspiration:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/altenewllc/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/altenew
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/altenew
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/altenew/
Card blog: https://www.blog.altenew.com
Scrapbook blog: https://www.mixedmedia.altenew.com

Visit www.altenew.com to shop for your crafting stash.

Contact our Customer Happiness Team at support@altenew.com if you have any questions.

Speaker 1:

Hello everybody. And welcome back to another episode of craft your life with Alta new. This is Jen Raza and today our amazing guest is Nicole Pika . Dora. Hi Nicole. Hi Jen. Thanks for having me. How are you doing today? I'm great. How are you? I'm doing excellent. Um, it's funny because you and I have known each other for so many years, but there may be some listeners out there who don't know much about you. So I'd love if we could just get started with you introducing yourself and pretty much what your role is at Alta new .

Speaker 2:

Sure. All right. Um, I'm Nicole, for those who don't know me are new to me and I was originally born and raised in South Korea and I permanently moved to United States back in Oh seven when I got married to my husband, Nick. So we actually met during my last year of college and we almost didn't date because my English name was Nicole and his name is Nick. So the kind of call was we didn't want to be made fun of. So

Speaker 1:

Although I think that is the cutest thing about your marriage. You get to be Nicole and Nick, right ?

Speaker 2:

So , um, it's funny, we've been married over, you know , 10 years and people still make comments about that when they, when they first , um, encounter or meet meet us. So , um, yeah, so I moved to the States in Oh seven and I

Speaker 1:

Had went in the United States before that.

Speaker 2:

Yes, I did go to college in Hawaii for four years before that. So I was going back and forth between there and then my home whenever we had , um, vacation, like in summer off or winter time off. So , um, I, I studied international business management there for four years. And then after I graduated, I moved to California permanently and I've been here ever since then. And then I went through various jobs and somehow I got to ultra new and I've been, I've been here since then. It's been five years almost.

Speaker 1:

I don't care . But that you came to become part of our team.

Speaker 2:

It's, it's, it's actually a really dream job of mine. And , um , I'm very fortunate to be able to work within a company in the industry that I, that I have so much passion about. And my current role for the company is operations director. So I oversee anything that happens behind the scene. So whenever customers are shopping and also new website, the things that go behind us that is product related or customer support, ultra Academy, all of those things are under

Speaker 1:

My umbrella. Yeah. I like to think of you as like the backbone of the company, because I know that there are so many things that wouldn't run smoothly if you weren't there to keep them going are so sweet. Thank you. It's true though. Nicole's got her hand i n almost everything, a ny product you see, she's been on a journey with that before you even see it

Speaker 2:

There's too many babies, but I love them dearly.

Speaker 1:

So your job at all to new Academy, what does that entail?

Speaker 2:

That's actually my very first project. When I started with Alton U it is an online education platform where you can take various classes, covering different products, different techniques, featuring amazing instructors that we have. And even if we are covering similar techniques or similar themes, there's always something different because different instructors are teaching that theme. And there's usually six to eight lessons. There are some smaller classes that has, you know , three lessons or one lesson sometimes t oo. So it just a g rade area where you can learn different inspirations techniques and tips i n using the products that you already have. And we try to roll that out every month. So t here's monthly classes that goes on that has six lessons. And then we also have m ini classes that sometimes happen throughout the year.

Speaker 1:

So I'm going to put you on the spot a little bit, Nicole, and I am curious what your favorite alternative Academy classes. That is

Speaker 2:

Definitely a tough question because we have such an amazing classes that feature wonderful instructors and cool techniques. And I would have to say all about layering series is one of my favorites. I'm not just going to pick one and we already have five different classes un der t hat series and it's a free class, so people can take advantage of it and understanding different layer, fl our s tamps that we have and learn how to layer them well and get project inspirations. Um , a nd also I love anything that has wa tercoloring t heme on it. And I know Jen, you taught two classes already on that, and we have some other amazing classes that feature our wat ercolor pr oducts and different watercolor techniques. And th ose are

Speaker 1:

Really fun. And I liked that you mentioned the all about layering classes, because I feel like a lot of customers who know our products know us for our layering stamps, especially hiring florals, right ? Like it's a good way to get to know those stamps, but I think it's also a great way to get to know the alternate Academy platform without having to invest the money into taking the class. And I think anyone who takes those free classes will realize right away the value in the alternate Academy, because even myself I've been crafting for a while . I learned so much from the other instructors when I watched their videos. And I just feel like it's a great way to engage with the other people who are teaching and the regular classes. And it's just a really fun way to get, to learn some new techniques and new skills. That's very

Speaker 2:

True. And I very biased because I love our products and the things that you and Tasmeem and other designers design are just really pretty. But I think we do layer floral stamps really well. And when people take advantage of those free educational resources, they can really truly understand the beauty of the layering images and the details to create the wonderful projects. And it just is fresh and it's just endless and people can get different results by learning the same techniques and they can mix different colors and have different arrangements. And just, it's just endless, I think.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. I totally agree. Now, even though you're involved in the backend of a lot of what happens at all to new headquarters, you also have a blog and Instagram where you get to showcase your own crafty creations. How much crafting do you do in your time? Cause I know you're so busy with other things that you're doing behind the scenes, but

Speaker 2:

Right. So I think this is the biggest dilemma that probably anyone that works for a crafting company struggles with is that you have this dream job of working for a company in the industry that you really love and you love to craft, but you don't have enough time to play with all the products. So unfortunately I haven't really crafted in , in a few weeks and that's, that's really shame.

Speaker 1:

I know , and it, it is tough because like you said, a few times his dream job, that is absolutely what we're doing. We're living this dream world where it's like, there's beautiful products at our disposal. And the biggest thing we battle with is time because it takes a lot of time to keep a company running, especially a small business. Because even though I feel like our team has grown and grown, we still are taking on a lot of responsibilities and it leaves a little time to actually do our passion, which is the creating. So I'm glad that although you're busy, you do find time to , to squeeze it in.

Speaker 2:

There's always a few favorite of mine every time when we do release our monthly stamp and dye releases along with subscriptions. And I just love seeing all the designs and I do make sure that I have some time to play with them and share. So I try to squeeze it in whenever I could. And it is relaxing, right? So it's, it's a part of distressing process as well. Um, it is hard when you are working for a small company because all of us wear so many different hats and you just have to keep it going to, to bring out products that people would enjoy and we are here to serve them. So we try to take that into a priority instead of before our personal joy in crafting. I think, so it definitely makes me happy when people share their projects with us and posted on social media, using their products that they've got from us. And that's kind of my indirect crafting satisfaction, I guess for now. Yeah . I try to, I try to make sure that I get, I can craft once in a while , but I should make more time definitely too , to kind of get my creativity going and keep up with it.

Speaker 1:

Definitely. Now, how long do you think you've been crafting?

Speaker 2:

It's been well over 10 years. It's yeah, it's been a very long.

Speaker 1:

And did you start with paper crafts or was there something else that you did that evolved into paper crafting? That's

Speaker 2:

Interesting story. Um, the way that I got to know the paper crafting is through scrapbooking . And when I went to college, I babysat , uh , uh, three kids of my classmates and he had a four year old boy at that time into twin girls that were just born and his wife had a creative memories. I think that's the company that was called. I don't know if they're still in business, but she did the scrapbooking parties and I was invited to one. I don't think I made it to the party, but that's how I knew. Oh, like s crapbooking exists. I didn't know. And obviously i t k now

Speaker 1:

Scrapbooking party would be where you would see products from a company. And

Speaker 2:

I think so I think that's like a, you go into like a home party and they show your products. Maybe you make a project do like making takes like an in-home workshop concept. So that's how I knew, but you know, I was, I was single and I was 20 something years old in college. So I didn't really need to get into a scrapbooking at that time. And it was very foreign concept to me because in Korea, you don't have that. The paper crafting industry is very different there. So the handmade cars or scrapbooking is kind of a foreign concept in different way. Um , so that's how I first exposed to the paper crafting concept. And when I got married, I had to stay home for about six months before I got any driver's license or could apply for jobs. Cause I had to wait for my citizen or the green card process to go through. So I had to stay home and that's when I dove into making my wedding album. So we print out all the photos. Nick bought me cricket, my very first credit. So I use that. I had ton of dye cutting and I didn't really get into stamping until much later, but that was my very first paper craft crafting project I did. Um, so that was the wedding album. And that's actually the one that I did like a hands-on project for the first time. And then after that, I slowly moved o n t o card making b ecause for me it was more suitable for me to enjoy it. And you know, m e cards, it's like a more of a quick project a nd you can see the completion w here scrapbook, you kind of build up on the album t oo. Y eah,

Speaker 1:

For me, the concept of making a scrapbook is so overwhelming. I'm sure I could count on one hand the number of scrapbooking layouts I've created. And I don't think been happy with any of them. It feels like the magnitude of that 12 by 12 sheet is just scary. I know someone who's not into this is like 12 by 12. That's no thing i t's really different coming from a card makers perspective. Ca use I 'm so used to an 82 s ize canvas that if I were to go and do something on a 12 by 12, it's just very daunting.

Speaker 2:

I think I'm , I think I'm safe to assume that the scrapbookers look card making very differently too , from the way that we look at it. So there's definitely different audience and different enjoyment you get out from each platform. But for me, card making was a lot more fun. I think I liked the process of having a quick project completed every time when you start something, instead of kind of letting it sit there and just kinda wait until you actually complete the whole page is so I found that I enjoy card making more. So ever since then, I started getting into, you know , more stamping , uh, being exposed as for mediums. I learned different things for, from a YouTube videos that are out there. So yeah, that's how

Speaker 1:

I think . That's amazing. Yeah. I was speaking with Lydia in our last episode, Lydia Evans. Who's awesome . And she also started with scrapbooking . So it makes me wonder, am I the odd man out having started with card making and not really having any experience with scrapbooking? I think

Speaker 2:

The reason why a lot of scrapbookers or crafters start with scrapbook layout is because you have pictures and you have memories and you want to start kind of dabbling into preserving that. And I think that's where most people are exposed to. And then they just kind of transition from there, whether they stick with scrapbook layouts and transitioned into a different form of scrapbook layout from there, or they go into a pure card making and stick with it,

Speaker 1:

Right . Although our scrapbooking team is so incredibly talented at what they create, but then every once in a while they'll make a card and I'm like, that's also brilliant. How are you amazing at both card makers don't have, but

Speaker 2:

Design team definitely brings out so many great inspirations. And sometimes I would, I would want to get into scrapbooking because I'm looking at their projects and I am doing awe and Oh, and Oh my goodness, it's just, I'm all going over their projects. And it can be daunting definitely for not used to it right.

Speaker 1:

The way they layer elements. I feel like it's all. Cause if I were to layer elements, it would just look like I threw a bunch of stuff on the paper and glued it in place, trying to fill in the space. Everything has a purpose. I I'm just really in all of that talent. Yeah .

Speaker 2:

I'm glad we have them because they definitely bring out different perspective on how same products can used in so many different ways.

Speaker 1:

So how did you end up on the alternate team? So

Speaker 2:

I had my own online class that I did. What I did back a while ago was to work with small STEM companies and I would do a class around their new releases. So if they come out with a new release, I will do a few lessons around them and have a small online education platform of my own. So it was just like a side thing that I did back then when I was running my blog and I featured Alton you , and one of those classes, and from there, I got to start a conversation with, u m, Tasneem and, and see what I could help with. And that was back in 2015, then we started with alternate Academy and I slowly grew into other parts of the company since then. It was funny. C ause when a lternate first came out, u h, in 2014, I did email his name and say, Hey, do you need a nybody who is on a design team? And the email that I got was, Oh, we're currently not having a design team. I was like, dang it, I love your designs. I w anted to design for you. But so that was the very first communication that I had w ith his name. That's like, even before we even met

Speaker 1:

To us to not have a team until we could compensate properly. Tasneem talked about that a little bit in our first craft your life with alternate new podcast. So go check that out. If you want to hear more about how the company was born and how we ended up getting a design team in the first place.

Speaker 2:

So for sure, so people haven't heard it, they should definitely check it out. But yeah, so that's how I got started with Alton . You that's

Speaker 1:

Incredible what a journey.

Speaker 2:

It has been a very fun and exciting journey and it's, it was a really good opportunity for me to be a part of a company in the industry that I just been have a passionate of , you know, 10 years ago.

Speaker 1:

And when you started , um, you also had another job, correct?

Speaker 2:

I did. I did have another job at first. I did. Um, I was at library. I was a librarian at an elementary school and a middle school. I think it's from TK, the transition kindergarten all the way to fifth grade. So I did a work as a librarian for part-time for about a year before I fully transitioned into alternate new as a full-time member.

Speaker 1:

Any of your experience from working in the library, transition to your position at all to new? I don't know. That's a really good question cause it's such a different field, different

Speaker 2:

The field and the target audience that I, that I dealt with with in that job and with this job is completely like opposite, right? I dealt with a lot of young generations and now we have older generations that enjoy those paper, crafting products. But I,

Speaker 1:

I think there's this underlying like education that does kind of flow from one field to the other. You know, when we were talking about a ll t he new Academy and how we want to make sure that to spread the joy of crafting, but also to educate and to give people techniques and give them new ways of thinking about the products that they have. And I feel like that kind of connects to

Speaker 2:

Very true. I loved sharing my passion of reading and getting knowledge from books to the little kids and they, you know, their eyes brighten up when they hear about the stories and when they get to read books, they enjoy. And I think that part of me still carries over in this position where I love teaching workshops and having an in-person interactive connection with our customers and then seeing them enjoying the products and making projects are really , uh , one of the greatest joy that I 'd take away from this job. So I guess that part is a good connection and I do wish that more younger generations could take part and enjoy a paper crafting. I know there's a lot of digital mediums out there that for them to have a different part of the creativity going, but for me personally, there's nothing more enjoyable than having a h ands-on experience, touching paper, having S am inking a nd getting your hands dirty, creating a project is, is, you know, there's nothing else that would be them.

Speaker 1:

I definitely feel that we need to get the younger generations into it because I feel like , um , although over the past 10 years or so, I feel like we are seeing more younger designers emerge. It's definitely an industry that is dominated more by middle age and maybe even above so wonderful. If we can kind of get more of the younger generation interested doing this because it's probably something that would turn into a lifelong passion for them.

Speaker 2:

I try to make sure right now we can't do it because of the pandemic. But whenever I see my seven-year-old nephew, I always make sure we have some crafting time together. And one of his joy, whenever he comes to visit my place is to s tand. Like he knows, okay, my aunt has all these products, all these things that he can play with and he would stamp, he chooses the i n colors that he wants. He asked me to take that one out, that one, out that one, uh , he goes through all of my Sam dra wers and take out the desi gns. So he pulls out all the stamps that he wants to use it with. And I would take out the card sto c k for him. He would color, he loves to color and fill in. So I try to make sure we have that aunt and nephew bonding time together over art. An d I want to encourage him, you know, continue as he grows up. I want to continue to encourage that so that he has that outlet. That 's gre at. I think for us to see younger influencers popping up. So I think that's great way for us to encourage younger generations to take advantage of the pap e r.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. That's a really good point too. Especially now that so much of this industry has shifted towards social media. I feel like even myself, when I feel like I'm in a creative rut and I hop on Instagram and I check out all the card making hashtags , um , it's definitely something that the younger generation is already fully invested in. So that could be a nice way to kind of get them into it is through social media. It's very true.

Speaker 2:

So I hope they get more exposed to younger generations and we'll see kids involved in paper crafting and project reading in the future.

Speaker 1:

Sure . And it keeps them off those devices even just for a little bit until it's time for them to post their creations on Instagram. Right . So what are some of your all-time favorite crafting mediums? Oh ,

Speaker 2:

You think coloring mediums, any type of coloring mediums, I'm such an obsessor over it. Um, I can never have enough in colors, although I don't have enough time to obviously to play with all of them. I just love seeing colors. So I love to collect, I'm going to say collect, not,

Speaker 1:

Not to use them . Lord , we're all collectors, right?

Speaker 2:

Acting different color mediums, like color pencils, watercolor mediums. As my current obsession, I love diving into different water coloring mediums. And I love the fact that the company that I worked for even come out with various of them, cause we have watercolor brush markers. We have liquid water colors,

Speaker 1:

The metallic watercolor

Speaker 2:

And there's different colors. And you know, the pans that we have. So even, even just that I get to enjoy different mediums , um , different platform over that mediums. But I also try to expose myself into different types of watercolor pens and learn their properties and color differences. And it's just really fun. And I think it just never ending world for you to explore and , and indulge. And they just, the colors just bring me a lot of happiness. And I think that's why I am so obsessed with them.

Speaker 1:

My current favorite. Yeah. I feel like watercoloring has always been a passion of mine even in my early, early, early days before I got into paper crafting, I always loved doing water coloring . And then once I figured out like, wait, I could combine these two, I c ould make a little work of art on this little tiny canvas, r ight. W rite to somebody. And I think that's amazing, but what's kind of funny. And like, I almost shouldn't say this b ecause it seems like such a c op o ut, but I started probably like maybe 10 years ago, eight years ago. I'm not sure a while ago painting on my cards, but I loved the painting so much that I didn't want to give the cards away with my little watercolor art so I would scan it. A nd t hen, and then I would give that away printed version of it. And I would still like layer the sentiments on top. Like I would still make it look like it's still a h andmade card. R ight. The painting itself was just a printed out copy.

Speaker 2:

I never knew . Knew. Yeah. I never thought about that. That's a , if you really ended up loving it. Yeah .

Speaker 1:

Right. You get to keep that .

Speaker 2:

I send out that part of the art too .

Speaker 1:

I also did it one year for my Christmas cards because the thought of doing like a hundred watercolor cards, i t's a little bit too much to handle. So I did this scan and print and then I think I added like some glitter to it. So I was like, i t's still feels handmade. I t hink

Speaker 2:

The one thing that I really love about w atercoloring is that you just don't know what kind of results you'll get in a way, b ecause every time you want to collaborate, even if you want to color the same image, you get something different. And I think that's one thing that people like doing. They just explore, they enjoy the mediums and the results will come up p rettier anyway. So they get to have a different experiences through the journey. I think that the fact that journey part is a l ittle bit more enjoyable than seeing the, the, having the results. I think that's why that's the one thing that I love about wat ercoloring be c ause it 's just so relaxing. It's ver y ca lm and it's therapeutic in your mind. And at the end you get cards or projects that you created and colored, and it looks just really pretty. The wat ercolor pa rt is that you have to be forgiving and try not to be perfecting in the process of it because the watercolor, the more you touch it, I think it can lead to a disaster if you keep, if you keep lik e da bbling on it, right. So you just work on it and leave it there until it dries. And it just looks, looks pretty. That's, that's how I see it. And it's fun to create cards with us.

Speaker 1:

So in addition to coloring mediums, do you have any other crafting obsessions?

Speaker 2:

He started dabbling into alcohol inks and I created a couple of projects before a pandemic happened and we had alcohol shortages,

Speaker 1:

Like the rubbing all calls, because one thing that you need to move the colors around a little bit,

Speaker 2:

And I just love how, how flowy they are. And I'm such a OCD and perfectionist. And when you work with alcohol ink, you kind of have to let that go a little bit. So it, for me, it's , it's self challenging and you have to be comfortable to be out of your own comfort zone. So I just let the colors flow the pigments flow and just try to work with that and seeing that being a part of the progress for me to just kind of like, okay, you can let go. It doesn't have to be always like perfect or within the lines or have to be all neat and clean. And I ended up loving the results that come out of it. So I want to definitely work more with our callings. Um, for now I've only did a two size c ard. That's the card platform medium that I use, but I want to do more of a bigger size canvas so that I can try to explore the property of the, o ur c allings more a nd create different p onds. I've been obsessed, obsessed with I 'll call i n projects on Instagram is so inspirational and it's amazing to see what these artists do with alcohol i nks. So I want to be able to kind of challenge myself to get to that place.

Speaker 1:

That's great. And I really can relate when you were saying that you can be a bit of a perfectionist and you just have to let go and let them do its thing. Right . And that was something I struggled with when I did start getting into watercolor and the first watercolor painting I ever did, maybe I was in high school and I got this watercolor set and I took a brush that had like four hairs on the end of it. It was the tiniest brush. And I remember dipping it in and like trying to do all these little detailed things. And in the end it just looks pretty terrible. It was a Rose, it was very like overworked. And the paint really looked too thick because I was using a tube watercolor w if you're not familiar, a pan watercolor, you kind of activate the color when it's already set into a, from shape to water, color is liquid. So it's kind of like a paste texture maybe, right? So if you don't add enough water, it's not going to move. So

Speaker 2:

It's going to be a pasty pasty mess.

Speaker 1:

And it was after I saw that painting. I'm like, I am going about this all wrong. This is not a medium where I could go in with that tiny little brush and super particular. I just got to let the water flow and , and do its thing. And I feel like I've learned a lot since that, but that always sticks in my mind. As I tried to be too controlling with my watercolors.

Speaker 2:

I think one of the reasons why card makers or paper crafters in general are terminated to jump into our coloring or incorporate the water color into their paper. C oughing is because they are afraid of messing up and it's a completely different right? W ith t he stamp. You have a solid image, right? And you have ink and you stamp it. And that's exactly how you will get. And, you know, and you expect the results before you even get started with watercolor. You kind of have to be forgiving. Even if y ou a re coloring an outline image, the coloring move, the color might move differently, depending on how much water you add and how much brush stroke you put it into. So I always tell my students, whenever I teach a class that you just, you just let it work a little bit, start soft because watercolor always d ry, s oft, and you can always add more color o r you can, you c an n ot really take out, right. You cannot really take off the color once you've laid down. So I always tell them, just start slow and start light. And you can always go back and add more colors and build intensity that way and let them just kind of do their thing. The water will move the piggy . And if you add it to the projects or Fest and the spreading of the pigment can be really pretty and results when it's dried . So I let them just to kind of experiment with that , but you do have to allow yourself to experiment. You have to allow yourself to be a little bit more easygoing and go with the flow and less do the pigment and the water do their thing, and just enjoy the, enjoy the process.

Speaker 1:

I love that. Just go with the flow. Right , right, right. Words to live by in crafting and in life.

Speaker 3:

That's hard too , to relax a little.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And again, I think like you've mentioned the pandemic once or twice, and it's funny that like, that's what our world is revolving around right now. And I think the go with the flow is advice that I need to take, you know? Cause it , it is hard. We're talking about controlling things . I can't control how things are right now . So I hop in my craft room, do my thing, go with ,

Speaker 2:

Have a creativity escape of your own in this chaotic world right now.

Speaker 1:

Exactly. It's go to your happy place. Right ? Well, it has been delightful speaking with you. Is there anything else that you wanted to share with our listeners?

Speaker 3:

Uh , I think I shared pretty much anything I have or ,

Speaker 2:

Or that you asked. I think , um, hopefully this, by listening to this, they got to know a little bit about ultra new behind the scene of what's happening and how the teams kind of get together and work together. Um, and what we try to do to bring out fun and enjoyable products for customers to enjoy. But I think as a crafter, being able to be a hands on behind the scene to bring out something that our crafters would enjoy is a really fun and unique thing that we all in this company, because we are all crafters before we are workers. I do hope that our customers would see that and we are doing our best to bring out something they could enjoy personally, as much as we would do. Um, but yeah, I am. I'm really great to have a craft part of my life because it brought so many good connections. You know, I got to know you, I got to be friends with you and we've known each other for years now. Same for Tanzania and Lydia and other parts of the team members that we have. And not only brought me a good connection, but also it brought me something that I would enjoy in my life and, and be able to have my own creativity. It's not hard to have a creativity in our life. If you don't have to be a super talented born with skilled artist , anybody can enjoy a crafting or creativity flow with various kinds of mediums. And I think paper crafting is one of the greatest way for people to kind of dive in and have their own creativity going. And I'm just lucky to be in it. And we're lucky to have you.

Speaker 1:

It's nice. We have our little tight-knit alternate family, and I'm glad that we're starting off this podcast, speaking with members of our team, because not only does everyone get to learn a little bit more about what happens at all to know that you don't get to see when you go to our blog or you don't get to see when you go to our Instagram or Facebook. But I feel like even there's little things that I learned about you today.

Speaker 2:

Um , hopefully our crafters feel a little closer to us as they listen .

Speaker 1:

Yes. Well, thank you everybody for listening and thank you. Huge. Thanks to Nicole. They come see you for joining us today.

Speaker 2:

Thank you so much for having me and happy fasting everyone.

Speaker 1:

Yep . Always remember to craft your life. Aye .